Building Better Leaders

What the world’s most forbidding peaks teach us about success. Mountain guide, entrepreneur and best-selling author Chris Warner explains the secrets of success in mountaineering and business.

By Lindsay Sutula July 11, 2016

Chris Warner is one of only a handful of Americans who have summited both Everest and K2 and lived to tell about it. And tell about it he will, at the OIA Rendezvous in Denver this September.  

Warner says: “I have worked with some of the best teams in the world…I work with covert ops, special ops teams, and entrepreneurial teams…all are under-resourced. And they know if they are not successful, someone will die.” 

Warner, who is also a successful businessman—the founder and CEO of EarthTreks climbing centers—knows that it’s not just the summit that’s important; it’s the lessons learned during the climb. In an article published in Baltimore Smart CEO, Warner said, “Mountaineering is…a game of skill. Practice makes us better. Bad experiences teach us good judgment. Skill and technique, efficiency and fitness—mental, physical, and emotional—combine to help us manipulate the odds.”  

True for mountaineering; true for business. That’s why we invited Chris to join us in Denver. 


Hear Chris Warner’s tales and insights first hand at Rendezvous 2016 in Denver.

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Warner co-wrote the book on leadership, High Altitude Leadership is a Top Ten Best Seller on Amazon 

To thrive in the face of today’s business challenges and tomorrow’s unpredictable risks, you need to become the type of leader whose career, team and company excel in the most extreme environments,” says Warner. With so much at risk, you have to be the High Altitude Leader who uses every bit of your talent and every ounce of your strength to guide your team to peak performance. 

To thrive in the face of today’s business challenges and tomorrow’s unpredictable risks, you need to become the type of leader whose career, team and company excel in the most extreme environments. With so much at risk, you have to be the High Altitude Leader who uses every bit of your talent and every ounce of your strength to guide your team to peak performance.Chris Warner, author, High Altitude Leadership.

Adept at leading in high risk environments and coaching mission-critical teams, Warner also teaches leadership at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.  

We look forward to having Warner on our stage at Rendezvous. He will kick off the OIA Rendezvous with his keynote presentation: High Altitude Leadership: Surviving K2, the Killer Mountain on Monday, September 26, 2016  at 1:00 pm — 2:00 pm. Register for Rendezvous and read more about the presentation.

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